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SaaS Interviews with CEOs, Startups, Founders

What if you knew data behind the fastest growing SaaS companies today? Each morning join Nathan Latka as he spends 15 minutes interviewing SaaS founders. You'll learn how SaaS CEO's launched their startup and grew it into a business. SaaS Founders range from bootstrapped to funded, MVP to 10,000 customers, pre revenue to pre IPO.
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Now displaying: May, 2017
May 6, 2017

Garth Moulton. He’s invested and has advised a number of technology startups and was responsible for revenue growth for the channel for Pipl Inc.  After 11 years of sales experience in the Bay area, Mr. Moulton had the perfect startup journey with Jigsaw, which was drawn up from 2 guys with a whiteboard to a $175M exit, in 2010, to Salesforce.

Famous Five:

  • Favorite Book? – The Speed of Trust
  • What CEO do you follow? – Tim Ferris
  • Favorite online tool? — LinkedIn
  • How many hours of sleep do you get?— 6
  • If you could let your 20-year old self, know one thing, what would it be? – “That time is not boundless”

 

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:18 – Nathan introduces Garth to the show
  • 01:58 – Garth didn’t get depressed after Jigsaw’s exit
  • 02:23 – Garth and Jim stayed at Salesforce for a year and a half, after the acquisition
  • 02:43 – Pipl was running together with Jigsaw
    • 02:48 – Garth met Pipl’s CEO during the early days of Jigsaw and they partnered together
    • 03:03 – Pipl would drive traffic to Jigsaw
  • 03:51 – Pipl was a typical search engine, driving traffic to partners
    • 04:31 – In the last 3 years, Pipl was more of a data company that sold API access and basic search tools to access data and profiles to 3 channels
    • 04:46 – First channel is a search app like Spokeo and Instant Checkmate where Pipl supplies them the data
    • 05:19 – Second channel is fraud alert and ID validation
    • 05:44 – Pipl checks if the email is real
    • 05:56 – Garth overlooked the companies that were going to use the data for sales and marketing
    • 06:18 – Pipl is partners with Full Contact
  • 06:39 – Nathan has been trying to find the mother of data sources
    • 06:52 – “Jigsaw was the source of the data”
    • 07:12 – LinkedIn is still the biggest source of data for B2B
    • 07:50 – There’s a LinkedIn private channel
    • 08:26 – LinkedIn has gotten more and more aggressive in making the data available
  • 08:58 – There have been CEOs who received a cease and desist order from LinkedIn
    • 09:24 – Some of the companies are wholly dependent on LinkedIn
  • 09:56 – Garth shares the same sentiment as Nathan that there’s no mother data source
  • 12:30 – An average of a hundred corporations have bought the API access of Pipl
  • 13:14 – Pipl’s business solution average price point
    • 13:21 – $1200 a year for unlimited searches, per person
  • 13:37 – Team size is 40
    • 13:47 – Team location
  • 14:15 – Pipl is bootstrapped
    • 14:27 – Garth became interested in Pipl, because it was completely bootstrapped
  • 15:15 – Garth had an agreement that he would come on for a couple of years and expand the channel for Pipl
    • 15:37 – Garth is on the cap table
  • 17:00 – The Famous Five

 

3 Key Points:

  1. Data sources are sharing each other’s data to grow and verify their own data—there is no mother of data sources.
  2. A company that is bootstrapped definitely has more freedom and control of their company.
  3. If you can start your business as early as you can, do it.

 

Resources Mentioned:

  • The Top Inbox – The site Nathan uses to schedule emails to be sent later, set reminders in inbox, track opens, and follow-up with email sequences
  • Organifi – The juice was Nathan’s life saver during his trip in Southeast Asia
  • Klipfolio – Track your business performance across all departments for FREE
  • Acuity Scheduling – Nathan uses Acuity to schedule his podcast interviews and appointments
  • Host Gator– The site Nathan uses to buy his domain names and hosting for the cheapest price possible
  • Audible– Nathan uses Audible when he’s driving from Austin to San Antonio (1.5-hour drive) to listen to audio books
  • Freshbooks – Nathan doesn’t waste time so he uses Freshbooks to send out invoices and collect his money. Get your free month NOW

Show Notes provided by Mallard Creatives

May 5, 2017

Benjamin Cohen. He’s the CEO and leading T-REX, with a strong vision for the future of enterprise financial technology and its impact on marketing and making markets more transparent and efficient. He’s built the T-REX team and the T-REX software platform by combining the most sustainable elements of finance with modern SaaS technology.

Famous Five:

  • Favorite Book? – Influence
  • What CEO do you follow? – Elon Musk
  • Favorite online tool? — LinkedIn
  • How many hours of sleep do you get?— Between 6 and 7.5
  • If you could let your 20-year old self, know one thing, what would it be? – “I wished that I knew that not everything was of the utmost consequence for my entire life”

 

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 02:24 – Nathan introduces Benjamin to the show
  • 02:55 – T-REX is a fintech company that makes complex capital markets more liquid by making them more transparent and efficient
    • 04:04 – T-REX provides a familiar framework where their clients can slice and dice everything
    • 04:15 – “We’re just making the risks more transparent”
  • 04:20 – T-REX has an enterprise SaaS model
  • 04:59 – Customers are paying $2k-20K per month depending on the functionalities they need
  • 05:09 – Benjamin launched T-REX in 2012
  • 05:55 – The Ecosystem Integrity Fund is T-REX’s series A lead investor
  • 06:12 – T-REX has raised $15M in total
    • 06:26 - T-REX had 2 priced equity rounds
  • 06:32 – Team size is 21 and based in New York
    • 06:39 – Half of the team is based in Tel Aviv, Israel and are mostly software engineers
    • 06:57 – The cost of living in Israel is a bit lower
  • 07:35 – T-REX has over 225 users
    • 07:51 – The 225 are all paying customers
  • 08:28 – The model of T-REX is that investors are coming in and looking for different deals than what originators have out, which includes different loan portfolios—specifically in the renewable energy sector
  • 09:34 – Loan’s interest
  • 09:44 – The secure ties
  • 10:30 – Average MRR
  • 11:13 – “I invested 2 years of my time before getting a dollar”
  • 11:19 – It took Benjamin 2 years to raise capital
  • 11:36 – Benjamin’s fund was from his previous role in Macquarie Bank
  • 12:12 – Renewable energy presented a great slate of a market
  • 12:33 – Benjamin funded T-REX with a 6-figure capital
  • 12:52 – A junior engineer’s average salary from Tel Aviv
    • 13:53 – Everybody in the company has equity
  • 14:03 – Benjamin is the sole-founder of T-REX
  • 14:32 – Customer churn is currently zero
    • 14:54 – Benjamin is expecting T-REX to be incredibly sticky
  • 15:20 – T-REX is selling additional seats and their customers can sell more modules
    • 15:29 – T-REX can expand horizontally to different markets and vertically where they can sell different models
  • 15:50 – Years ago, T-REX has set up their own broker/dealers
  • 16:05 – CAC is dependent on the customers
  • 17:11 – T-REX will do a $10K conference sponsorship and they need to be there
  • 17:35 – T-REX series B closed in November 15th
  • 20:00 – The Famous Five

 

3 Key Points:

  1. Be in the space that you know best and don’t fear being a solo founder.
  2. It is actually GREAT to make mistakes and GREAT to fail, as long as you learn from it.
  3. Don’t fear that every decision you make or action you take has a lifelong consequence in your life—it simply isn’t true.

 

Resources Mentioned:

  • The Top Inbox – The site Nathan uses to schedule emails to be sent later, set reminders in inbox, track opens, and follow-up with email sequences
  • Organifi – The juice was Nathan’s life saver during his trip in Southeast Asia
  • Klipfolio – Track your business performance across all departments for FREE
  • Acuity Scheduling – Nathan uses Acuity to schedule his podcast interviews and appointments
  • Host Gator– The site Nathan uses to buy his domain names and hosting for the cheapest price possible
  • Audible– Nathan uses Audible when he’s driving from Austin to San Antonio (1.5-hour drive) to listen to audio books
  • Freshbooks – Nathan doesn’t waste time so he uses Freshbooks to send out invoices and collect his money. Get your free month NOW

Show Notes provided by Mallard Creatives

May 4, 2017

Pablo Estevez. He’s a Mexican entrepreneur who co-founded HolaGus, an artificial intelligence company that focuses on automating customer service and sales via chat for Spanish speaking countries. Since founding his company, he has been distinguished for receiving awards like The Diamond Winner by MassChallenge.

Famous Five:

  • Favorite Book? – The Hard Thing About Hard Things
  • What CEO do you follow? – A lot
  • Favorite online tool? — N/A
  • How many hours of sleep do you get?— Usually 7
  • If you could let your 20-year old self, know one thing, what would it be? – “That this is going to be really, really hard, I was going to work a lot of hours”

 

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:14 – Nathan introduces Pablo to the show
  • 02:00 – HolaGus develops AI to automate customer service and sales via any chat channel
  • 02:11 – HolaGus charges businesses for every assisted conversation
    • 02:39 – HolaGus’s standard fee is 1-2 Mexican pesos
    • 02:47 – HolaGus has a pay-as-you-go model
  • 03:20 – HolaGus is a B2C business and is similar to GoButler
  • 03:37 – “If we really want to scale the business, we have to focus on the AI”
  • 04:04 – HolaGus was launched in 2015
  • 04:10 – There are 3 co-founders
  • 04:22 – HolaGus has raised capital and is about to close their third round
    • 05:04 – HolaGus has raised a total of $1.4M
  • 05:23 – HolaGus focuses on the customer’s closing and how much automation they’re able to create
    • 05:39 – “We try to keep the bots, like, between 80-90%”
    • 05:53 – HolaGus focuses on closing the biggest amount of clients that they can
    • 05:58 – HolaGus has a lot of interesting commercial deals in the pipeline
  • 06:09 – HolaGus has already sold 3 contracts
    • 06:16 – HolaGus only started selling 4-5 months ago
    • 06:21 – HolaGus is hoping to close 85 clients
  • 06:55 – HolaGus is still on pre-revenue
  • 07:10 – HolaGus has different projected revenues and models for their 3 customers
  • 07:12 – HolaGus has an upfront development fee of $25K
  • 08:02 – HolaGus pricing will depend on the technology
    • 08:13 – HolaGus develops AI, specifically for a business
    • 08:39 – HolaGus is now creating an ocean of knowledge
    • 09:08 – “If we have a thousand clients, our AI gets smarter and smarter really quick”
  • 11:08 – Pablo believes that they automate a lot
  • 11:25 – Total projected conversations for the first 3 customers will be 20K-40K conversations
  • 11:56 – HolaGus tries to charge a minimum of monthly consumption
  • 12:30 – The Famous Five

 

3 Key Points:

  1. AI technology can be complicated and needs continuous development.
  2. Play around with different payment models to see what works best and is most profitable.
  3. Starting and running a business is tough work—you just have to be dedicated.

 

Resources Mentioned:

  • The Top Inbox – The site Nathan uses to schedule emails to be sent later, set reminders in inbox, track opens, and follow-up with email sequences
  • Organifi – The juice was Nathan’s life saver during his trip in Southeast Asia
  • Klipfolio – Track your business performance across all departments for FREE
  • Acuity Scheduling – Nathan uses Acuity to schedule his podcast interviews and appointments
  • Host Gator– The site Nathan uses to buy his domain names and hosting for the cheapest price possible
  • Audible– Nathan uses Audible when he’s driving from Austin to San Antonio (1.5-hour drive) to listen to audio books
  • Freshbooks – Nathan doesn’t waste time so he uses Freshbooks to send out invoices and collect his money. Get your free month NOW

Show Notes provided by Mallard Creatives

May 3, 2017

Peter Aronson. He’s an award-winning journalist who’s has been featured on NPR and Marketplace. He’s also been a vice president in the corporate world. Now, his startup helps Mexico transform that notorious Mexican tap water into perfectly drinkable clean-tasting purified water.

Famous Five:

  • Favorite Book? – The Founder’s Dilemma
  • What CEO do you follow? – N/A
  • Favorite online tool? — HubSpot CRM
  • Do you get 8 hours of sleep?— 7
  • If you could let your 20-year old self, know one thing, what would it be? – Peter wished he took business courses and knew about the GTD (Getting Things Done) methodology

 

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:12 – Nathan introduces Peter to the show
  • 01:33 – People aren’t supposed to drink the water in Mexico
  • 01:41 – Mexico became the No. 1 consumer per capita in the world
    • 02:08 – 70% of the consumed bottled water in Mexico is 5-gallon jug
    • 02:21 – An average Mexican family is spending more for their water than on their broadband or landline
  • 02:48 – Peter’s company is Biluu
  • 03:07 – Peter had been curious about the startup and business world
  • 03:13 – Peter was the corporate vice president for US-Indian Joint Venture
  • 03:30 – While in the Himalayas, Peter would boil his drinking water every day
  • 03:35 – Eventually, Peter taught the people how to use a water purifier
  • 04:00 – Peter searched how to properly filter water and what should be taken out
  • 04:25 – Peter’s wife is Mexican and he returned to Mexico
  • 04:36 – Biluu is a for profit business, not a non-profit
    • 04:44 – Biluu is currently doing direct sales and YouTube promotions
    • 05:00 – The main challenge in Mexico is changing people’s habits
    • 05:12 – “We’ve had to establish trust”
  • 06:12 – Biluu filtration system cost is $170
    • 06:50 – For $170, they can get virtually unlimited purified drinking water for a year
    • 06:58 – A cartridge will last for a year
  • 07:11 – 1500 people are drinking Biluu’s water
  • 07:35 – Some of Biluu’s filtration systems are in restaurants
  • 07:53 – Biluu has sold around 100 units
  • 08:10 – The previous water filters in Mexico weren’t effective or scientifically proven
  • 08:43 – 42% of Biluu’s growth came from referrals
  • 08:55 – Biluu isn’t manufacturing by themselves
    • 09:28 – Biluu has an exclusive license to the technology
    • 09:39 – The deal is by volume commitment
    • 09:57 – Biluu needs to maintain a 6-figure sales
  • 10:14 – Biluu is totally self-funded
  • 10:20 – Team size is 5 and all are based in Mexico City, Mexico
  • 10:47 – Biluu is trying to look for brand ambassadors to reach out to people
    • 11:06 – Biluu is also doing Facebook paid ads and Google AdWords
  • 12:17 – The Famous Five

 

3 Key Points:

  1. It’s not easy to change people’s habits, but you HAVE to try—especially if it’s for the better.
  2. Learning from a community can be a life changing experience.
  3. Find a brand ambassador who has a good online reputation and large following.

 

Resources Mentioned:

  • The Top Inbox – The site Nathan uses to schedule emails to be sent later, set reminders in inbox, track opens, and follow-up with email sequences
  • Organifi – The juice was Nathan’s life saver during his trip in Southeast Asia
  • Klipfolio – Track your business performance across all departments for FREE
  • Acuity Scheduling – Nathan uses Acuity to schedule his podcast interviews and appointments
  • Host Gator– The site Nathan uses to buy his domain names and hosting for the cheapest price possible
  • Audible– Nathan uses Audible when he’s driving from Austin to San Antonio (1.5-hour drive) to listen to audio books
  • Freshbooks – Nathan doesn’t waste time so he uses Freshbooks to send out invoices and collect his money. Get your free month NOW

Show Notes provided by Mallard Creatives

May 2, 2017

Alex Mehr. He’s the founder of Zoosk, which filed to go public in 2014. His current venture is MentorBox, a unique and new self-help concept. Before that, he was an aerospace scientist at NASA.

Famous Five:

  • Favorite Book? – How to Win Friends and Influence People
  • What CEO do you follow? – Jeff Bezos
  • Favorite online tool? — Trello
  • Do you get 8 hours of sleep?— I try at least 8
  • If you could let your 20-year old self, know one thing, what would it be? – “To take more risks”

 

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:10 – Nathan introduces Alex to the show
  • 01:43 – Zoosk announced to go public for $200M
    • 02:24 – Zoosk decided to stay independent, so they didn’t pursue going public
    • 02:44 – When you go public, you make projections about the growth rate and what you want to do financially
    • 03:05 – The expectations from the public market for tech companies who go public are different than those who do not
    • 03:14 – Alex and the team didn’t want the company to push hard for a quarter by quarter growth
  • 03::50 – Zoosk was launched in 2007
  • 04:00 – Alex and his co-founder split everything 50/50
  • 04:21 – Alex and his co-founder have worked for 8 years and they never had a problem
    • 04:40 – Alex and Shayan have different domain expertise and they respect each other’s’ domain expertise
  • 05:30 – Zoosk has grown rapidly until 2014
    • 05:36 – “But the company was not profitable”
    • 06:40 – Alex still has his equity and is part of the board
  • 07:36 – Zoosk is growing again
  • 07:53 – MentorBox is a self-education self-improvement education box
  • 08:07 – Alex has always been a book reader his whole life
    • 08:33 – Alex would gift his friends books all the time
    • 08:43 – 10% of the population’s primary method of learning is reading
    • 08:50 – There are 4 methods of learning: auditory, visual, reading, and kinesthetic
  • 09:20 – The idea of MentorBox is a subscription for business books that Alex thinks everybody should read per month
    • 09:38 – MentorBox makes the information concise so that you can study the main concepts in 10 minutes
    • 09:46 – MentorBox delivers in 4 formats
  • 10:28 – Tai Lopez is Alex’s co-founder
    • 10:41 – 7 years ago, Tai and Alex met at an online gaming conference
    • 11:05 – It turned out that Tai reads 1 book a day
    • 11:40 – Tai and Alex have a 50/50 deal with MentorBox
  • 12:03 – Alex had a landing page to test MentorBox
    • 12:19 – They had a video that explained the product
    • 12:27 – Tai has a large social media following so he tested his ad on his social media
    • 13:05 – In the first test, they were able to sell $80K worth of product
  • 13:22 – MentorBox is priced at $89 a month
  • 13:50 – MentorBox’s retention
  • 14:14 – MentorBox’s space is education subscription
  • 14:40 – Average retention in the space
  • 15:12 – Tai and Alex knew that MentorBox would be a sustainable business
  • 15:38 – LTV and CAC are both high
  • 16:18 – MentorBox also relies on word-of-mouth marketing
  • 16:37 – The cost per box drops depending on the volume
  • 17:26 – MentorBox buys from distributors and publishers directly
    • 17:48 – MentorBox is looking at getting directly from the author
    • 18:18 – The number of books MentorBox has bought from Ryan Holiday
  • 19:15 – The Famous Five

 

3 Key Points:

  1. The public market’s expectations for companies that go public are very different and can put on additional pressures that, otherwise, wouldn’t exist.
  2. Do what you love AND share what you love doing to other people.
  3. Be a risk-taker – you’ll learn more that way.

 

Resources Mentioned:

  • The Top Inbox – The site Nathan uses to schedule emails to be sent later, set reminders in inbox, track opens, and follow-up with email sequences
  • Organifi – The juice was Nathan’s life saver during his trip in Southeast Asia
  • Klipfolio – Track your business performance across all departments for FREE
  • Acuity Scheduling – Nathan uses Acuity to schedule his podcast interviews and appointments
  • Host Gator– The site Nathan uses to buy his domain names and hosting for the cheapest price possible
  • Audible– Nathan uses Audible when he’s driving from Austin to San Antonio (1.5-hour drive) to listen to audio books
  • Freshbooks – Nathan doesn’t waste time so he uses Freshbooks to send out invoices and collect his money. Get your free month NOW

Show Notes provided by Mallard Creatives

May 1, 2017

Sean Ellis. He’s the founder and CEO of GrowthHackers.com, he coined the term “growth hacking” in 2010 after using it to ignite growth for Dropbox, Eventbrite, LogMeIn and Lookout. He also founded and sold customer insights company Qualaroo, growing it to millions of dollars in recurring revenue.

Famous Five:

  • Favorite Book? – The Hard Thing About Hard Things
  • What CEO do you follow? – Peep Laja
  • Favorite online tool? — The Calm App
  • Do you get 8 hours of sleep?— Yes
  • If you could let your 20-year old self, know one thing, what would it be? – “I wished my 20-year old self knew things are going to be pretty good”

 

Time Stamped Show Notes:

  • 01:25 – Nathan introduces Sean to the show
  • 02:03 – Sean speaks at The Capital Factory in Austin, Texas
    • 02:07 – Sean’s talk was about viral coefficients and why it’s important to decrease the time of the original share to really drive growth
  • 02:50 – If you don’t have a lot value at the foundation of the growth, it’s hard to make your business sustainable
    • 02:56 – Sean tries to understands the value of the product first, then goes backwards from there
  • 03:16 – Sean used the referral program for Dropbox
    • 03:30 – Sean, together with the group, came up with the idea of giving away free storage for referrals
    • 03:45 – Sean’s friend tested a double-sided referral program prior to Dropbox
    • 03:53 – Sean’s friend is James Siminoff, founder of Ring and the previously the CEO of PhoneTag
  • 04:45 – Sean provides advice on viral coefficients
    • 04:55 – In the case of DropBox—“Referrals were strong before the referral program went in place”
    • 05:12 – Understand what the motivation is for people to do refer
    • 05:18 – Think about every step in the process; for example, what’s the prompt that gets people to share?
    • 05:42 – Optimize all the steps of the referral process
    • 05:47 – The more you have qualitative and quantitative insights about what’s happening, you’re going to be more informed in the tests that you are running
  • 06:41 – Eventbrite didn’t have an incentive, but just a natural viral product in itself
    • 07:18 – Eventbrite helps companies sell tickets
    • 07:30 – Eventbrite doesn’t only offer a convenient experience but also good SEO, social integration, and other factors that will help you sell tickets
  • 08:00 – Sean worked for LogMeIn’s marketing for 5 years
    • 08:05 – LogMeIn is now a $5B company
    • 08:07 – “Natural word-of-mouth was huge with LogMeIn”
    • 08:10 – By the time Sean left LogMeIn, 80% of the users were coming in through word-of-mouth
    • 08:15 – LogMeIn was spending more than $1M monthly with a 3-month payback on acquiring customers
    • 08:21 – “Value drives word-of-mouth”
    • 08:35 – At first, the majority of LogMeIn’s users didn’t really use the product
    • 09:25 – The CEO and whole team worked together to find out the problem with the customer experience
    • 09:55 – LogMeIn has always been cash flow positive
  • 10:13 – Look up how Sean runs questionnaires in his Youtube videos and slideshows
  • 10:31 – Qualaroo is about customer insights
    • 10:45 – Sean acquired Qualaroo in 2012
    • 10:49 – Qualaroo was acquired from KissMetrics
    • 10:53 – Qualaroo was a side business and Sean was an advisor for it
    • 11:08 – Sean built Qualaroo to millions of dollars of recurring revenue and sold it last year
    • 11:45 – Sean bought it for less than a million dollars
    • 12:00 – The revenue of Qualaroo was less than a hundred thousand dollars
    • 12:25 – Qualaroo was acquired by Xenon
    • 13:01 – Jonathan Siegel owns Xenon
    • 13:14 – Sean wanted to sell Qualaroo and wasn’t trying to get top dollar for it
  • 13:57 – Sean had a 7-figure advance on the book, so he’s not losing money
    • 14:09 – Sean has signed with Crown Business
    • 14:29 – Sean has self-published a book before
    • 14:49 – Sean’s background and Growth Hackers allowed him to get a great deal with Crown Business
    • 15:00 – Sean is the guy who came up with the term “growth hacking”
    • 15:09 – There are already a lot of publishers who approached Sean to write a book about growth hacking
    • 15:22 – Morgan Brown is Sean’s co-author
    • 15:47 – Morgan and Sean hired an editor to write the proposal
    • 16:10 – Sean’s agent is Lisa DiMona
    • 16:30 – The process is getting an agent to invest in your book, they help you with the proposal and they pitch your book
  • 17:21 – Sean’s plan to make the book a successful one
    • 17:26 – First is to gain momentum to get on the New York Times’ Bestseller List
    • 17:43 – The weekly sales is what will determine whether you make the list
    • 18:05 – “If you get on the list, then it’s a lot easier to stay on the list”
  • 18:32 – People’s perception on growth is often a bit flawed
    • 18:45 – Growth hacking is more about testing stuff and doubling down when something works
  • 19:04 – Sean has some copies of his book for his Microsoft presentation
    • 19:20 – Sean also has some copies for different companies
    • 19:31 – Sean offers ticket bundles for Growth Hackers Conference in May, in LA
    • 19:37 – Growth University’s growth master training course has bundled with book sales
    • 19:43 – Sean is running bundled ads, too
    • 19:51 – Sean is getting sub $50 sales on their course with the book bundled
    • 20:51 – Sean is currently at a ConversionXL conference
    • 21:05 – Peep Laja was on Episode 620, and he is the founder of ConversionXL
  • 21:37 – Sean didn’t commit to buying any books
  • 22:35 – Why should people buy this book rather than the other growth hacking books?
    • 22:39 – “Ryan Holiday’s book was awesome to bring attention to growth hacking”
    • 22:47 – There hasn’t really been a guide book to what do you do as a team, especially for bigger companies who want to replicate what Facebook or Uber has done
    • 23:12 – Marketing isn’t that hard, but you need cultural change, cross-functional coordination, and collaboration
    • 23:31 – Hacking Growth has the methods for what you need to drive growth at its foundation
    • 23:44 – It is powerful and people need help
  • 24:06 – Crossing the Chasm provides observations regarding the growth process
    • 24:20 – The main difference between this book and Sean’s is that it doesn’t tell you how to organize your team to exploit that growth situation
    • 24:32 – “We’re not just telling you the fundamentals of how growth works, we’re telling you how to run a growth process across a team...”
    • 25:02 – “You need to have a very integrated coordinated team and the best time to build it in your business is early, when the culture is malleable to do it”
  • 27:20 – The Famous Five

 

3 Key Points:

  1. Regarding viral coefficients, the more you have qualitative and quantitative insights about what’s happening in the referral and sharing process, the more informed your tests will be.
  2. Growth hacking is more about testing stuff and doubling down when something works.
  3. You NEED a very integrated, coordinated team—the best time to build this into your business is early on, when the culture is still malleable.

 

Resources Mentioned:

  • The Top Inbox – The site Nathan uses to schedule emails to be sent later, set reminders in inbox, track opens, and follow-up with email sequences
  • Organifi – The juice was Nathan’s life saver during his trip in Southeast Asia
  • Klipfolio – Track your business performance across all departments for FREE
  • Acuity Scheduling – Nathan uses Acuity to schedule his podcast interviews and appointments
  • Host Gator– The site Nathan uses to buy his domain names and hosting for the cheapest price possible
  • Audible– Nathan uses Audible when he’s driving from Austin to San Antonio (1.5-hour drive) to listen to audio books
  • Freshbooks – Nathan doesn’t waste time so he uses Freshbooks to send out invoices and collect his money. Get your free month NOW

Show Notes provided by Mallard Creatives

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